Sunday 9 September 2007

John Zorn, George Lewis, Bill Frisell - News For Lulu (1988)



"On news for Lulu, Zorn, Lewis and Frisell have arranged the works of Dorham, Mobley, Clark, and Redd... In unleashing his obsession with the hard-bop masterpieces, Zorn shows us that it is possible to make coherent statements without being limited by genre. And by focusing on a narrow bit of musical history - the Blue Note sound of the late '50s - and placing emphasis on the compositions of musicians most often thought of as improvisers, Zorn begins the process of restoring Dorham, Mobley, Clark, and Redd to their rightful positions. Zorn has heard the truth: the hard-bop sessions on Blue Note produced a brilliant combination of contrasting meters, ostinatos, and blues feeling mediated by the sophistication of bebop. They produced an extraordinary variety of emotions, and continue to define small group dynamics to this day.

Without a rhythm section, [the trio] exposes the way the tunes work, making them even more intense, and taking the project immediately out of the constraints of the jazz tradition... The short tunes, reflecting Zorn's current obsession with hardcore, help make this an endlessly listenable record." Peter Watrous

John Zorn - alto sax
George Lewis - trombone
Bill Frisell - guitar

link @320

13 comments:

Theo said...

nice one! thanks!

Anonymous said...

many thanks for this!

1009 said...

thanks! just picked up lewis' book on the aacm. i've gotten through the the preface & i have to say it's one of the most responsibly written books i have ever encountered thus far. recommended.

Bent Bondo said...

I have been looking in vain for this sold-out album for many years. Happily, it is going to be re-released around July of this year. Highly recommended. ID hatOLOGY 650; more at hathut dot com

Korene said...

Keep up the good work.

Mr. Minute said...

Thnks for this great jazz record!
Here is something in return for all you Lulu Fans


LULU IN BERLIN

Description: A rare, 48-minute interview with Louise Brooks, by vérité documentarian Richard Leacock and Susan Steinberg Woll.


Download Links:
http://rapidshare.com/files/142343648/LIB.part1.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/142349809/LIB.part2.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/142381989/LIB.part3.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/142546758/LIB.part4.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/142551559/LIB.part5.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/142556118/LIB.part6.rar

Happy 2009!

bravo juju said...

Thanks a lot for the gift, Mr. Minute.
And may 2009 protect you from the forces of moral corruption.

Ric said...

Still the best Zorn release in his megamothic discography. A SUPERB RECORD.

PH said...

I LOVE THIS! THANK YOU FROM BELGIUM

JimJak said...

oh boy,
you hit me.

first "the man in the elevator", and now this treasure. good god. let's see what comes up next.

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Anonymous said...

http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/unbound/jazz/dzorn.htm

"On News for Lulu (Hat Art 6005), a 1987 trio session with Frisell on guitar and the trombonist George Lewis, Zorn plays compositions by Sonny Clark, Kenny Dorham, Hank Mobley, and Freddie Redd--unsung jazzmen associated with Blue Note Records in the late fifties and early sixties, a period and a sound now being driven into the dust by solemn young neoclassical hard-boppers. Zorn's approach is the antithesis of theirs. To begin with, his instrumentation is unorthodox (no rhythm section), and his choice of tunes is noncanonic. And instead of merely zipping through the chord changes of the tunes, he pays careful attention to their melodies and rhythms, finding in them improvisational possibilities that even their composers overlooked."